Class Arbitration

Consumer Financial Services Arbitration: Another Perspective

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Much has been said and written about Congress’ rejection of the CFPB proposal to ban class action waivers in arbitration agreements between consumers and financial services companies. One of the most frequent statements I have heard from some politicians in the media is that Congress has voted to ban class actions against banks. As is true with many political statements from both sides of the aisle, this one is only partially true. Here are a few additional (but not alternative) facts to place Congress’ action in context.

  • The CFPB rule, and not Congress’ rejection of it, would have represented a change in the law. Since the Supreme Court’s 2011 decision in AT&T Mobility v. Concepcion, class action waivers have generally been enforceable in contracts for consumer financial services. The CFPB proposed rule was based on the agency’s authority granted under the Dodd-Frank Act. However, Congress and the President had the final say regarding whether the rule would take effect, and

Supreme Court Will Hear Class Action Waiver Cases

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Last week, the Supreme Court consolidated and agreed to hear three appeals of Circuit Court decisions concerning whether class action waivers contained in employment arbitration agreements infringe on employees’ rights under Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act.  According to the schedule currently in place, briefing on these cases will commence in late February 2017.  Unless a ninth Supreme Court justice is appointed, confirmed, and seated before oral argument in this consolidated appeal, the possibility of a 4-4 decision—and resulting preservation of the status quo–looms large. 

 

Fifth Circuit Reaffirms Enforceability of Class Action Waivers in Employment Arbitration Agreements, But Their Fate Remains Unclear

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Employers commonly use arbitration agreements to minimize the expense and exposure of employment-related claims.   By mandating arbitration of employment disputes, they hope to ensure that these matters are resolved in a cost-effective and confidential manner.  Many arbitration agreements go a step further, requiring employees to pursue their claims individually, and to waive their right to proceed on a class or collective basis.   Unfortunately, the certainty employers have striven to achieve with such agreements has proven elusive in recent years, as the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) and several courts have found that class action waivers violate employees’ rights.

Although the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2011 decision in AT&T Mobility LLC v. Concepcion upheld the enforceability of class action waivers in the consumer context, in the years since, the NLRB has repeatedly rejected the use of class action waivers in the employment context.  In In re D.R. Horton, the NLRB held that class action waivers inherently infringe on employees’